Joint NGO Statement: Humanitarian and Security Implications of the COVID-19 crisis in northern Iraq

Joint NGO Statement: Humanitarian and Security Implications of the COVID-19 crisis in northern Iraq
16 April 2020 An impending humanitarian and security disaster looms large in Iraq. The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates an ongoing crisis that affects displaced communities across the country, including the survivors of atrocities perpetrated by the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS). These already traumatized communities now face restrictions of movement that will exacerbate underlying psychological distress that may lead to increased suicide rates. Furthermore, Iraq’s recent economic collapse aggravates social instability and causes a security vacuum, which in turn heightens the risk of further ISIS attacks and sows the seeds for future atrocities. The Government of Iraq and the United Nations (UN), including the World Health Organization (WHO), can take simple and effective action now by following the steps outlined below: The public health system in Sinjar and the wider Nineveh Governorate was decimated by ISIS during its brutal occupation and genocidal campaign in Iraq, beginning in 2014. According to the UN, 1.8 million people remain displaced, living in internally displaced persons (IDP) camps across Iraq due to persistent insecurity and a lack of reconstruction work. Globally promoted hand-washing practices are simply insufficient to arrest the spread of a respiratory disease like COVID-19 in such conditions, while social distancing will prove impossible in high- density camps where scores of families live in direct proximity to each other. At present, it is impossible to apprehend the extent of the spread of the virus because no testing for the disease is taking place in the camps, while restrictions of movement impede the work of humanitarian actors who provide basic essentials such as food, water, and medicine. Many Yazidis (Ezidis/Yezidis) want to return to Sinjar, but security, reconstruction, and basic services are still lacking to allow a dignified return. There are currently only two hospitals and just one ventilator to assist the current population of around 160,000 people in the region. The WHO must undertake an urgent assessment mission to Sinjar, Tel Afar and the Nineveh Plain, and provide testing capacities for all IDP camps. Another alarming corollary of the COVID-19 pandemic in Iraq is the psychological impact on at-risk communities, including Yazidis, Turkmen, and Christians, such as Assyrians. Prior to the outbreak, Médecins Sans Frontières reported on a debilitating mental health crisis among Yazidis in Iraq, including a rising number of suicides. The entire Yazidi population is experiencing mental trauma caused by the acts of genocide, and some are displaying severe psychological difficulties. Among those at heightened risk are the women and girls who experienced systemic sexual violence, and the boys who were forcibly recruited by ISIS. No effective trauma treatment is currently being provided to children that were held in captivity or were born out of the war. COVID-19 has also resulted in the suspension of the limited psychosocial therapy support that was being provided. Mental health professionals have identified hundreds of civilians at high risk for suicide, and two suicides by self- immolation have already been reported. Many more attempted suicides continue to go unreported due to stigma. The WHO must immediately address this acute mental health crisis and implement enhanced suicide prevention awareness campaigns. COVID-19 and the precipitous drop in oil prices have caused the Iraqi economy to collapse, leaving a dangerous security vacuum for ISIS to exploit. Indeed, the resultant political turmoil and social strife recall the very conditions that earlier incarnations of ISIS and its supporters capitalized on during its initial surge almost a decade ago. According to the International Crisis Group, ISIS in its weekly newsletter Al-Naba called on its fighters to attack and weaken its enemies while they are distracted by the pandemic. COVID-19 has also hastened the departure of some coalition forces from Iraq, weakening counter-terrorism operations, while some ISIS detainees have recently escaped prison in Syria. There is an urgent need for reform in the civilian security sector, in order to integrate regional militias into a unified Federal Police that upholds the rule of law and protects all citizens, regardless of religion or clan affiliation. To counteract the continued ISIS threat, the Government of Iraq must work with the United Nations and expedite efforts to bring ISIS fighters to justice for the genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and to incorporate the aforementioned international crimes into its penal code.
COVID-19 is a pandemic the likes of which we have not seen before. Survivors of genocide and other mass atrocity crimes are now waiting for this silent death to pass through the camps and their homes, unable to fight back. There is a significant attendant threat to global security if ISIS uses this opportunity to regroup and return, but it does not have to be this way. Iraqi authorities and the United Nations must act now by means of:
– An urgent WHO assessment mission to Sinjar, Tel Afar and the Nineveh Plain in addition to the provision of testing for COVID-19 in all IDP camps.
– A WHO mental health crisis plan, including suicide prevention awareness campaigns.
– Expediting efforts to bring ISIS fighters to justice for the crime of genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes and to incorporate the aforementioned international crimes into its penal code.
– The UN Assistance Mission for Iraq (UNAMI) and the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights should, where present, monitor and report on the impact of measures taken by the authority to stem COVID-19 on human rights.

Signatories:
1. Aegis Trust (Rwanda/United Kingdom)
2. Air Bridge Iraq – Luftbrücke Irak (Germany)
3. Asia-Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect (Australia)
4. Assyrian Policy Institute (United States of America)
5. Center for Justice and Accountability (United States of America)
6. Central Council of Yazidi in Germany – Zentralrats der Êzîden in Deutschland (Germany)
7. Free Yezidi Foundation (The Netherlands)
8. Genocide Alert (Germany)
9. International Coalition for the Responsibility to Protect (United States of America)
10. International Council for Diplomacy and Dialogue (France)
11. Iraqi Christian Relief Council (United States of America)
12. Jiyan Foundation for Human Rights (Iraq)
13. Minority Rights Group International (United Kingdom)
14. Montreal Institute for Genocide and Human Rights Studies (Canada)
15. Nadia’s Initiative (United States of America)
16. Nobody’s Listening (United Kingdom)
17. Religious Freedom Institute (United States of America)
18. Sanabel Al-Mostaqbal Organization for Civil Society Development (Iraq)
19. Society for Threatened Peoples – Gesellschaft für bedrohte Völker-International (Germany)
20. Trauma Treatment International (United Kingdom)
21. Turkmen Rescue Foundation (Iraq)
22. Voice of Ezidis (France)
23. Women’s Refugee Commission (United States of America)
24. World Federalist Movement – Institute for Global Policy (United States of America)
25. Yazda (United States of America)

Statement

Through our following up the report of UNAMI to the Security Council on 28 August 2019 in its meeting No. (8606), presented by Ms. Jeanine Hennis-Plasschaert the Special Representative of the Secretary General of United Nations, we appreciate her statements about valuing the efforts made by Iraqi security forces through all of the units in their fight against terrorism, memorizing the sacrifices of these forces.

At the same time, we commend her call for the adoption of human rights standards in trials, investigative and judicial hearings.

We also appreciate her interest to support Iraqi woman and her reference to the absence of the Iraqi ministerial cabinet of a female figure despite the almost complete.

At the same time, we are surprised about her non reference to the marginalization of the third component in Iraq, namely, Turkmen in the same cabinet, despite the repeated demands by the representatives of Turkmen in the parliament and various events and meetings with representatives of the United Nations Mission in Iraq.

We would like to remind Ms. Jeanine Plasschaert about Iraq’s international obligations and the recommendations of the International Committee against Discrimination issued on January 11, 2019, Article 26, which called on Iraqi government to the need for equitable representation of all components in Iraq in public positions, bodies and functions.

Turkmen Rescue Foundation

Media Office

30 August 2019

Jobs in UNITAD

UNITAD advertised through the UN portal 9 National Professional Officers (NPOs) posts. The job descriptions are attached for your ease of reference.

p11.doc

unitad-2019-npo-006_associate_rule_of_law_officer_analysis_and_evidence_no-b-002.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-002_rule_of_law_officer_analysis_and_evidence_no-c.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-003_rule_of_law_officer_sexual_and_gender-based_violence_no-c.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-004_rule_of_law_officer_witness_protection_no-c.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-005_associate_rule_of_law_officer_legal_analysis_and_investigations_no-b.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-006_associate_rule_of_law_officer_analysis_and_evidence_no-b-002-1.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-007_associate_rule_of_law_officer_sexual_and_gender-based_violence_no-b.pdf

unitad-2019-npo-007_associate_rule_of_law_officer_sexual_and_gender-based_violence_no-b-2.pdf

TRF launches the first training course in Tel’ Afer under supervision of IOM

Under the supervision of the International Organization for Migration (IOM), TRF started the first training course on the management of small projects for women and ladies in Tal Afar.

This course comes within an ongoing efforts for staff of TRF to rehabilitate Turkmen areas that have been affected by the capture of Da’esh, and within a series of ongoing activities for the Foundation in these areas.

The course will involve a group of women and girls from Tal Afar where they will be trained to write and manage small projects that will be marketed later by the Foundation’s staff to the governmental and international bodies.

The course will also include a psychological rehabilitation program by a trained and specialized cadre.

The activity is part of a program sponsored by the International Organization for Migration (IOM), where the organization has trained TRF staff on advanced programs to prepare trainers and project management in areas that have been subjected to terrorism.

Media Office

TRF

“TRF participate in training workshop by IOM to support victims of ISIS”

TRF participated on Thursday, 6/12/2018, through its cadres from Tal Afar in the course organized by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) in Dohuk governorate on psychological support for the victims of Da’ash and helping in resolving disputes.

The program will last six weeks with different programs to help the organization’s staff to provide psychosocial support to victims of ISIS and rehabilitating them to be integrated into social life as well as support to resolve the city’s conflicts to restore stability.

TRF

Media office

“Serious security developments in Tuz, needs quick intervention”

 According to a local source in th district of Tuzhurmato( 180 km north of Baghdad ) , a mortar shell landed on the house of a Turkmen citizen one hour ago behind the Tuz sport  forum’s building. According to the source, a woman and two children injured with material damage in the house,as well, the people in the city are scarred fear of a rapid development of the situation in the absence of intervention by the central government.

We call for the central government to hold its responsiblty to protect the civilians in the city, the UN representation in Iraq should have a real and seriiod role in keeping safety of the innocent  people and stabilty in the city. 

TRF/ Media office

17 September 2017 

“There are heroes and makers for each victory, sons of Tal Afar an example for Iraqi victory”


“There are heroes and makers for each victory, sons of Tal Afar an example for Iraqi victory”

 “They sacrifice for Iraqis to give them the joy of victory and safety, while their families are deprived of it”

People of Tel Afer  were the first who have fired the revolution of the 1920s, the first who have resisted al-Qaeda terrorism and have tested the bitterness of their crimes in 2005 and 2006 and sacrificed by more than 2,000 martyrs in ongoing battles with al-Qaeda gangs.

In the war with Daesh, their blood, which have dropped on the land of Tharthar, Beiji, Mosul and other lands of Iraq is a witness to their patriotism and their sacrifice for the homeland.

The published statistics of the number of martyrs during the last three years in the war against Daesh, talks that the number of martyrs in the province of Basra reached (1000) martyrs, and the province of Nasiriyah (1200), while the martyrs of Iraqi Turkmen city of Tal Afar, exceeded (1300) martyrs, all of them are displaced with their families, and they are suffering and facing bitterness And the harshness of living in exile.

 In the battles to liberate the right coast of Mosul, the number of martyrs of Tal Afar so far (66) martyrs.

On 1st of June 2015 in the district of Tharthar 48 fighters killed from the sons of Tal Afar.

On 9th of February 2017 and during their response to the attack south of Tel Abtah (11) fighters from Tal Afar have been killed. 

Its sons have contributed to the liberation of dozens of cities and the return of their people to them and are still waiting for the liberation of their city , to return and live in it again. They are contributing to give the people the joy of returning home and safety, and they are deprived of this feeling.


Dr Ali Akram 

Chairman of TRF

13 July 2017